RECIPES

Aristotle was wrong. Plato was wrong.
We have five tastes, not four”

Experience the fifth flavor with the exotic Goldenberry, THE UMAMI BERRY.
Tangy sweetness in a bite and tasteful epiphany in your recipes!

what is

umami?

  • IT IS A SYNERGISTIC CULINARY

    EFFECT THAT ENHANCES

    GOOD TASTE

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  • it is known as

    the fifth

    primary taste

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  • IT IS THE

    KEY FLAVOR OF

    FRENCH, JAPANESE AND ITALIAN CUISINE

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  • IT MEANS

    YUMMY, DELICIOUSNESS

    OR A PLEASANT SAVORY TASTE

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UMAMI BERRY executed a study with researchers from the Netherlands in order to discover the amount of umami present in this exotic fruit.

PRESS

Here are some reviews about UMAMI and its meaning to our industry:

May 4, 2016

While the European culinary world and consumers are definitely familiar with the peculiar flavour of physalis, or cape gooseberry, in the United States it has only been recently introduced and exports of the Colombian fruit to this market have increased compared to last year. Also, since mid-2015, the quarantine process ceased to be indispensable for export.

"The quarantine process required by the United States has always been a major obstacle to the export of cape gooseberries, as this fruit requires special care and specific cold chain conditions for its proper storage. Colombian exporters have been working hard and we have invested heavily in the control of flies in order to gain better access to this market. Eventually, since last year, the requirement was removed solely for the cape gooseberry grown in the areas of Cundinamarca and Boyaca, thus opening a market with great potential," affirms Daniela Manjarres, representative of Ocati.

Read more here

January 29, 2015

This, the scientists suggest, indicates that the umami taste plays an important role in the basic palatability of food, and thus in overall health. When it is impaired or diminished, flavors lose their luster and eating becomes a chore. Many of these causes and effects overlap; some patients had diabetes, gastric problems, or depression, problems that can influence taste perceptions; some were taking medications known to contribute to taste problems or a lack of saliva. Umami, meanwhile, stimulates the salivary reflex: it’s literally mouth-watering. And when patients were treated for dry mouth, their umami sensations improved, and with it, their eating habits and health.

April 16, 2014

Umami came about in 1908 as the result of the tedious work of Kikunae Ikeda, a chemistry professor at the Imperial University of Tokyo. Ikeda had noticed a certain recognizable yet undistinguishable element of taste in particular foods including asparagus, tomatoes, and kelp, the latter of which he studied in great detail. What he found was that these foods had a high concentration of the amino acid glutamate. Ikeda went on to replicate the flavor in the substance we commonly refer to as MSG, or monosodium glutamate, which was marketed as the magical product that could enhance the flavor of any dish. Adam Fleischman wanted to capitalize on the inherent umami quality found in modern burgers when he opened Umami Burger in Los Angeles in 2009. He was striving to create what he deemed the “ultimate umami bomb” in a layered burger that also had an ideal b-to-b (bun-to-burger) ratio. The original recipe includes a 6-ounce patty made from ground local steaks cooked and seasoned with “Umami Dust,” oven-roasted tomatoes, shiitake mushrooms, caramelized onions, “Umami Ketchup,” and a Parmesan crisp, all sandwiched between a Portuguese-style roll. The burger and larger concept quickly caught on with the now-franchise restaurant chain expanding to more than 20 locations throughout California, and newly opened outposts in Las Vegas, Miami, and New York City.

April 09, 2013

Umami has been variously translated from Japanese asyummy, deliciousness or a pleasant savoury taste, and was coined in 1908 by a chemist at Tokyo University called Kikunae Ikeda. He had noticed this particular taste in asparagus, tomatoes, cheese and meat, but it was strongest in dashi – that rich stock made from kombu (kelp) which is widely used as a flavor base in Japanese cooking. So he homed in on kombu, eventually pinpointing glutamate, an amino acid, as the source of savoury wonder. He then learned how to produce it in industrial quantities and patented the notorious flavor enhancer MSG.

A quintessential example of something umami-tasting, says Paul Breslin of Monell University, who was among the first scientists to prove the existence of umami taste receptors, is a broth or a soup: "Something that has been slow-cooked for a long time." Raw meat, he points out, isn't that umami. You need to release the amino acids by cooking, or "hanging it until it is a little desiccated, maybe even moulded slightly, like a very good, expensive steak". Fermentation also frees the umami – soy sauce, cheese, cured meats have it in spades. In the vegetable kingdom, mushrooms are high in glutamate, along with those favoured by children such as petit pois, sweetcorn and sweet cherry tomatoes. Interestingly, human milk is one of the highest MSG-containing mammalian milks.

January 05, 2010

The four well-known basic tastes are sweet, sour, bitter and salty. Umami is the fifth. It’s from the Japanese “umai” which means “delicious” and “mi” which means “essence”, and it describes profoundly tasty food that saturates your taste buds with a flavor that may have elements of, but is not entirely, seet, sour, bitter or salty. If you enjoy red wine, prosciutto, asparagus, portabellas, olives, bacon, “stinky” cheeses and miso soup, then you know and like umami.

According to David Kasabian, co-author of “The Fifth Taste: Cooking with Umami,” the best words to describe umami are “savory, mouth-filling, brothy, meaty, satisfying and rich.” Abundantly “umami” foods include soy sauce, Parmesan, vine-ripened tomatoes, fresh corn, aged beef, mushrooms, anchovies and Worcestershire sauce. Some are great on their own, while some, like anchovies, are better enjoyed when melted into a sauce or mashed in a classic Caesar dressing.

November, 2009

Umami, the fifth basic taste, is igniting interest within the ingredient and culinary worlds. It’s been hailed as savory, delicious, dimensional, and mouth-watering. Food product developers call umami a “back pocket” ingredient—one that supplies the missing link in formulations or recipes. Chefs call umami “yummy” and use terms like “umami synergy” and “u-bombs” to describe the role it plays in food preparation.

“Umami has become one of today’s hottest culinary topics,” says Debbie Carpenter, Senior Marketing Manager, Foodservice and Industrial, Kikkoman Sales USA Inc.

Goldenberry

the UMAMI BERRY

It is an exotic fruit, Physalis peruviana, mostly grown in South America. It embodies the perfect combination of tangy & sweet flavors. Simply eat it as a snack or use it to enhance the flavor of your favorite recipes!

BENEFITS

health

Research into the health benefits of this fruit is currently being carried out in the following areas:

  • ANTIOXIDANTS

    Much of the antioxidants of Goldenberries are found in the many eatable seeds inside the fruit. The unique antioxidant power that stems from the different polyphenols and flavonoids content is the key to their anti-inflammatory value.

    Source: Puente, L.A., Pinto-Muñoz, C., Castro, E.S. y Cortés, M. (2011). Physalis peruvianaLinnaeus, the multiple properties of a highly functional fruit: A review.Food Research International.

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  • HEALING PROPERTIES

    Many medicinal properties are attributed to Goldenberry such as: antispasmodic, diuretic, elimination of intestinal parasites, helping to fortify the optic nerve, liver & kidney protection, lowering sugar levels and much more.

    Source: Puente, L.A., Pinto-Muñoz, C., Castro, E.S. y Cortés, M. (2011). Physalis peruvianaLinnaeus, the multiple properties of a highly functional fruit: A review.Food Research International

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nutrition

  • FIBER
  • NUTRITIONAL FACTS
  • PROTEIN
  • VITAMINS & MINERALS
  • FIBER

    Goldenberry contains fiber, which makes you feel fuller and less inclined to overeat. As well as, supporting a healthy digestion and cholesterol levels. It is also gluten free.

    Source: Ramadan, M.F. (2011). Bioactive phytochemicals, nutritional value, and functional properties of cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana): An overview. Food Research International.

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  • PROTEIN

    Goldenberry has a protein content exceptionally high for a fruit.

    Source: USDA SR26 2013 Nutritional Info: Groundcherries, (cape-gooseberries or poha), raw

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  • VITAMINS & MINERALS

    Goldenberry contains vitamins A, C , E, K1, B1, B2, B3, as well as fatty acids and carotenoids. Also, minerals such as phosporus, zinc, iron, calcium are found in it.

    Source: USDA SR No. 27 2014 Nutritional Data

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uses

  • FLAVOR ENHANCER
  • FRESH
  • GARNISH
  • VERSATILE
  • FLAVOR ENHANCER

    Enhance the taste of your favorite recipes with the pleasant and mouthwatering effects of the Goldenberry.

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  • FRESH

    Eat fresh Goldenberries as a snack, for breakfast or salads.

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  • GARNISH

    Enjoy decorating salads, juices and desserts with the marvelous attributes of color and beauty of the Goldenberry.

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  • VERSATILE

    Savor the versatile flavor of Goldenberry in sweet & savory recipes, featuring desserts, salads, meats and many more.

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Goldenberry: THE UMAMI BERRY

RECIPES

There’s no wrong way to include some Goldenberry THE UMAMI BERRY in your dishes. Get surprised by the exotic flavor!

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